Fragrances in the Workplace

I recently developed a sensitivity to fragrances. I get headaches, suffer from vertigo and generally feel awful. My boss allowed me to post signs that say “Fragrance-Free Zone,” but some people persist in wearing fragrances. Once, a perfume-wearing coworker came to my cube and I felt a migraine coming on. I explained my problem and asked her to step back. She was offended and told my boss my behavior was completely inappropriate. I’m non-exempt and can’t work from home: Part of my job is to take notes in meetings, and the biggest fragrance offenders are in these meetings. What can I do?

To read my answer, click here: Fragrances in the Workplace

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2 thoughts on “Fragrances in the Workplace

  1. I have sensitivity to certain fragrances. There was a particular man whose sent would sometimes cause me issues. After a while of looking at when this was happening and asking a couple questions (as he was very nice), we discovered it was a hand lotion that his girlfriend had given him. I gave him a tube of the unscented Aveeno I kept at my desk and bought myself a new one.

    Just thought I’d share a good story since I’m sure many people have negative reactions to this type of situation, as I’ve had too.

  2. I posted a reply to this original post ( 5 years ago), I am just going to briefly add a few things here. Scent allergies are hard to pinpoint but they are caused by the chemical scent traveling from the source. Most of the reactors are not natural occurring but man-made combination in a laboratory ( why do you think that the scientists wear googles and masks?). My son used to use those highly scented Axe products until he how reactive the scent was to others, but he wanted to wear a cologne. He switched to wearing a high grade cologne/ perfume made without any artificial additives and no one has a problem with the scent. It may cost more but he actually uses far less. Perhaps as part of dealing with the “high fragrance” wearers is to ask what they are wearing if it is that strong. The cheaper the product the more likely it is a chemical reaction when worn that is causing the problem to others.

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