LinkedIn Etiquette for Managers, Employees, and Recruiters

LinkedIn has 660 million users–and that number continues to creep up. With that many people, it’s a fantastic place to network, share ideas, and even make new friendships. There are lots of options for interacting on LinkedIn, but some things people do may limit the usefulness of this career-focused social media site.

I spoke to a group of LinkedIn LinkedIn Superusers. Many of them work as consultants, helping people to maximize their effectiveness on LinkedIn. They gave me the inside scoop on what not to do on LinkedIn. I’ll help you out with what to do instead:

Megan McCarthy: “I personally hate the people that connect and then all they say is ‘Hey! How are you doing today?’ Like what does that mean?”

To keep reading, click here: LinkedIn Etiquette for Managers, Employees, and Recruiters

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3 thoughts on “LinkedIn Etiquette for Managers, Employees, and Recruiters

  1. Re the LinkedIn user who gets sales pitches and sends a pitch back: we were JUST talking about doing this with spam calls in my chat room two seconds before I read it.
    The next time I get a sales pitch, I’m going to respond by pitching my novel.

    1. Perhaps a GoFundMe link accompanying the pitch… . Or include a sample chapter for their review …

  2. Am I missing sales pitches when I don’t accept link requests from people I don’t know? I’m a lowly retired project manager in the middle of nowhere, but if you read my Linked In messages you’d think I was a celebrity. I get “Please be my friend!” messages from all over the world, from strangers whose profiles suggest they have absolutely nothing in common with me. I keep wondering what they think I can do for them. I feel rude ignoring them but then I figure that they were rude first. (Of course, if I finish my book I could accept and pitch it to them. I am so going to remember that!)

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