How I KonMari’d My Home and My Job (and Improved Both)

I received the opportunity of a lifetime when Katarina Moy-Gard, picked me to do a thorough Marie Kondo cleanout of my home. Moy-Gard was completing a certification (which she now has) to be an official KonMari method organizer and needed a volunteer. I’ve never volunteered so fast in my life.

Most of you are familiar with the Marie Kondo organization method, which does not focus on putting things where they go but focuses on getting rid of things that don’t spark joy. As we went through my closets, cabinets, and paperwork, Moy-Gard asked me, “does this spark joy?” and “how many hot pads do you really need?” (I insisted I needed all 10 in my kitchen, and she asked me again, “just how many hands do you have, and does your whole family run around holding hot pans at the same time?” Answers, two hands, and no. I cut down to four and haven’t missed the ugly six I threw out.)

To keep reading, click here: How I KonMari’d My Home and My Job (and Improved Both)

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2 thoughts on “How I KonMari’d My Home and My Job (and Improved Both)

  1. That “Marie Kondo” method is good only if you have someone besides yourself asking that “joy” question. If you don’t have that person, the “cleanup/removal doesn’t stand up as a fast process. May I offer a slower form, pick one section, and concentrate all your efforts to streamline it to be more efficient. Just like using that virtual assistant to differentiate only key emails to read and eliminate or using a computer program to sort applications for consideration, there’s technology today available for filling out important tax forms and invoices, you only have to find the one that works best for your needs.
    Congrats on getting that cleanup of unneeded items at home, we all wish someone would do our homes.

    1. I tend to accumulate clutter. It would probably take forever for me to Marie Kondo my home or either of my offices. However, I like your idea of concentrating on one section at a time. My desk may seem — hopelessly — cluttered and messy (to others, at least; I flatter myself that I know exactly what’s in each of those piles!), but my top drawer is OCD-orderly! 🙂

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