6 Tips for Managing Holiday Time Off

by Evil HR Lady on December 3, 2018

 

Holiday time-off requests can be overwhelming. Everyone wants the exact same days off, and may submit their requests at the exact same time. So, how do you manage to keep your employees happy and your business running?

It’s not easy, but there are some things that you can do to make it easier. Not every solution works for every business, but take a look at this list of six helpful suggestions.

1. Alternate Major Holidays

If your business is open on major holidays, managing vacation requests can be extra difficult. Alternating holidays can be a useful approach. So, if one person gets Thanksgiving off, then they have to work Christmas or New Year’s Day.

If your business isn’t open on the holiday but is on the days surrounding it, the same principles can apply. For instance, if John worked on the day after Thanksgiving, he gets priority for the day after Christmas over Sue, who had Black Friday off.

To keep reading, click here: 6 Tips for Managing Holiday Time Off

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

emw December 3, 2018 at 5:30 pm
MariaRose December 3, 2018 at 5:59 pm

Great points for working around time off requests for holidays. One thing that makes this so stressful for those who have to give the time off and cover the schedule for work is the assumption of employees that holiday time off doesn’t effect their “given” time off of vacation, sick and personal days, but it falls right in the description of a time off request. The only obligation the employer has to give for time off request is to follow the mandated employment laws no matter what day it is.
In a dream world, everyone would only need to work business hours to get paid and have all weekends and holidays off, plus have extra time off for holiday gatherings because everyone is off. But in reality, business is a 24/7, 365 days of the year, so people have to realize that there’s no difference in any day of the year for business and no reason to stop functioning.
An easier way to explain this, is to realize that a fully productive employee needs to work at least 1500 hours a year to earn a full time salary. A part timer doesn’t need to work that in fact they are encouraged to work less. Looking at it this way, helps explain why the schedule must be covered. Businesses could not survive unless they were planned to be closed for every holiday..

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