It’s Perfectly Legal For Your Boss to Tell You to Drive a Nicer Car

An email telling an employee that he needs to drive a nicer car is circulating rapidly around the internet, and it’s as horrifying as you’d imagine. It’s also legal.

https://twitter.com/OregonProgress/status/1219832778629345280

As a general rule, unless something is specifically prohibited by law, it’s allowable. But, legal doesn’t always equal a good idea. 

There are some professions where it makes sense for your employees to have nice cars. If you’re driving clients around, it would be nice if it wasn’t a 1984 era hatchback with no air conditioning and the seats held together with duct tape.

To keep reading, click here: It’s Perfectly Legal For Your Boss to Tell You to Drive a Nicer Car

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13 thoughts on “It’s Perfectly Legal For Your Boss to Tell You to Drive a Nicer Car

  1. It may be legal, but it shouldn’t be. Were I that employee, rather than get a new car, I think I would find another way to get to work, so that my nosy, micro-managing, boss wouldn’t even see my car. And, if that didn’t solve the problem, get another job.

  2. Absolutely ridiculous. We have a 6 figure income and are usually driving 5-10 year old cars. It is even possible that the employee with the old car has a greater net worth than a boss with an expensive car. Given the poor judgement in this, I would expect there are other areas of dysfunction at this employer.

    1. Very true! The employee may be able to afford a new car, but they would rather be able to afford a great retirement. It’s icky when companies require employees to donate to United Way, but at least that’s a charity, this is a requirement to spend money on vanity.

      1. Exactly. One of our cars is 17 years old. It still runs. It’s just fine. Why would I replace a car that works just because it’s old? I would rather have money in the bank than have a new car.

  3. I’m finding the twitter thread…amusing. Lots of bad “legal” advice.

    (were I that employee? I think I would work on finding a new job)

  4. Wouldn’t buying a new car, when the old one you have is still fit-for-purpose (for just the purposes of appearance, as opposed to wanting it for other reasons,) be *more* an indication of financial recklessness?

    i.e. The complete opposite of the accusation being leveled at the employee?

  5. Some people are really really weird about making judgments based on what kind of car someone drives.

  6. If the boss wants the employee to drive a newer car (to impress the clients), then the boss or the company should give the employee a company car and pay for the maintenance costs and insurance.

  7. That is hilarious, I would have laughed in their faces if I got this email. I have income of over $250k, and seven cars and a motorcycle, some are practical, some are toys, the newest is 2009 (The fleet: 1991, 2000 2003, 2004, 2005, 2005, 2006, 2009.) Seven were bought with cash, the 2004 was a significant investment, and was bought in 2007 (after someone else enjoyed the biggest depreciation cycle) with a 3 year note acquired outside of the dealership.
    I see a shiny new $50k car being driven by someone who I know does not have $50k laying around and feel sorry that they fell victim of the mega financial marketing machine that the US car market is. FYI, Nissan, GM, Ford, etc… these companies’ primary business is financial products, they happen to also manufacture cars as a vehicle (pun intended) for which to attach their main product, the loan.
    I have been repeatedly been training my young adult children to quietly chuckle with distain when they observe their peers with a shiny new car and $500 less money in their pocket each month. So Far, So good, they are driving the 2003 and the 2006.

  8. Has anyone verified that this is real?

    I mean, there’s never been anything on the Internet that wasn’t click bait, right?

  9. jeez! I finally got rid of my 25 year old car that looked nice and I loved because my mechanic could not get parts (he looked on ebay). bet i have greater net worth than most people who (on the outside) look wealthier

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