Google Walkout Leaders Now Claim Retaliation

Last November, thousands of Google Employees participated in a walkout to protest everything from forced arbitration to transparency in sexual harassment investigations. Google listened and granted much of what the protesters asked for. So why are the organizers, upset and in the news again? Retaliation.

Illegal retaliation happens when you punish an employee (either overtly or covertly) after they make a protected claim. Protected is the important thing. You can certainly retaliate against someone for behaving poorly, or protesting something not protected under the law. (For an interesting example, see my Inc. Colleague, Alison Green’s example of interns being fired for protesting the dress code.) But, if you’re complaining about working conditions, reporting sexual harassment, or any other legally protected complaints, you should be protected from retaliation.

To keep reading, click here: Google Walkout Leaders Now Claim Retaliation

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5 thoughts on “Google Walkout Leaders Now Claim Retaliation

  1. I agree with Google here. Don’t see any retaliation, but I do see sour grapes on the part of the employees who I’m guessing are never satisfied. Get over it and move on

  2. I agree with Google here. Don’t see any retaliation, but I do see sour grapes on the part of the employees who I’m guessing are never satisfied. Get over it and move on.

    1. Really? You think the two leaders of the movement just happened to get demoted and/or have their pet projects cancelled?

      Highly suspect.

  3. Really? You think the two leaders of the movement just happened to get demoted and/or have their pet projects cancelled?

    Highly suspect.

  4. It’s human nature for managers to have negative feelings toward an employee they feel has falsely accused them of intentional discrimination. However, the underlying discrimination claim does not have to be valid for any subsequent adverse managerial action to be — rightly or wrongly — found to be retaliatory. Following any protected employee activity, management needs to tread carefully and softly.

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